University of Kentucky College of Agriculture

The use of enzymes in poultry diets

2010 POULTRY SCIENCE ASSOCIATION ANNUAL MEETING

Allzyme SSF increased AMEn of the corn-soy diet and improved performance of broilers.
T. Ao, J.L. Pierce, B. Hoskins, M. Paul, A.J. Pescatore, A.H. Cantor, M.J. Ford, and W.D. King.
Allzyme SSF is a naturally fermented product with activities of multiple enzymes such as carbohydrase and phytase. A study was conducted to investigate the effect of supplementing Allzyme SSF on AMEn and retention of P and DM of the diets and growth performance of broiler chicks in a 21d period. Dietary treatments included: 1) corn-soy reference diet containing 3150 kcal MEn /kg and 0.45% nonphytate P; 2) corn-soy low P and ME diet containing 3000 kcal MEn /kg and 0.25% nonphytate P; 3) diet 2 + 200 g Allzyme SSF /MT diet; 4) diet 2 + 400 g Allzyme SSF /MT diet. A total of 192 1-d old chicks were randomly assigned to 4 dietary treatments with 8 replicate groups of 6 chicks per treatment. Chicks were housed in starter cages in an environmentally controlled room with an ad libitum access to feed and water. Celite (acid-insoluble ash) was used as an internal marker with an inclusion rate of 1% for the assay of AMEn and retention of P and DM on d 20 by using 24h fecal collection. Chicks fed the low P and ME diet had lower (P < 0.01) weight gain and higher (P < 0.01) feed to gain ratio compared with other treatment groups. Dietary supplementation of Allzyme SSF in low nutrient diet at both levels increased (P < 0.01) weight gain and decreased (P < 0.01) feed to gain ratio of chicks. AMEn of the low nutrient diet was increased (P < 0.01) by supplementing Allzyme SSF at both levels. The retention of P and DM was significantly increased by supplementing 400 g/MT Allzyme SSF. Data from this trial indicate that supplementation of Allzyme SSF in corn-soy diet can improve the performance of broiler chicks by increasing AMEn value and retention of P and DM of the diet. 

2009 POULTRY SCIENCE ASSOCIATION ANNUAL MEETING

Investigation of replacing vitamin E with EconomasE® in broiler diet.
J.L. Pierce, T. Ao, R.F. Power, K.A. Dawson, A.J. Pescatore, A.H. Cantor, M.J. Ford, and Y.L. Xiong
EconomasE® is a proprietary blend of ingredients that maximizes antioxidant status of the animal and reduces the requirement of vitamin E (VE). A study was conducted to investigate the effects of supplementing EconomasE® in broiler diet on the performance, oxidative stability, meat quality and storage stability of broiler chicks. Dietary treatments included: 1) corn-soy control diet supplemented 0.3 ppm Se as selenite, but no VE; 2) corn-soy control diet supplemented 0.3 ppm Se as selenite, plus 50 IU/kg VE; 3) corn-soy control diet supplemented 0.3 ppm Se as selenite, plus 100 IU/kg VE; 4) corn-soy control diet, plus 200 g/ Ton EconomasE®. A total of 640 chicks was raised for six weeks. Eight replicate cages of 20 chicks were randomly assigned to each of four dietary treatments. Chicks were housed in floor pens with new litter in an environmentally controlled room and were given ad libitum access to feed and water. No significant difference among all the treatments was observed in terms of weight gain and feed intake. The breast meat from chicks fed EconomasE® showed better color stability and less amount of drip loss compared with that from chicks fed other treatment diets. The total antioxidant capacity of serum from chicks fed EconomasE® was the same as that from chicks fed additional 50 or 100 IU/ kg VE and was higher (P<0.01) than that from chicks fed control diet. The breast muscle from chicks fed EconomasE® had higher (P<0.01) Se content than other treatment groups. No dietary effect on breast muscle VE content was detected. The results from this trial showed that supplementing EconomasE® in broiler diet had the same or better effects on performance, meat quality and total antioxidant capacity of chicks compared with dietary supplementation of 0.3 ppm Se as selenite plus 50 or 100 IU/kg VE.

2009 INTERNATIONAL POULTRY SCIENTIFIC FORUM

Effects of dietary supplementation of Allzyme SSF® on the performance of chicks fed low phosphorus diets.
J.L. Pierce, T. Ao, A.J. Pescatore, A.H. Cantor, K.A. Dawson, and M.J. Ford.
Allzyme SSF® is a naturally fermented complex capable of increasing release of phytate-bound phosphorus, calcium, energy and amino acids from poultry feed. In order to investigate the effect of Allzyme SSF® on the performance of chicks fed low phosphorus diet, a total of 192 chicks was raised for three weeks by using the following treatment diets: 1) corn-soy positive control diet containing 0.45% available phosphorus; 2) corn-soy negative control diet containing 0.25% available phosphorus; 3) Diet 2 + 400 g Allzyme SSF® / Ton; 4) Diet 2 + 600 g Allzyme SSF® / Ton. Eight replicate cages of six chicks were randomly assigned to each of four dietary treatments. Chicks were housed in starter cages in an environmentally controlled room with an ad libitum access to feed and water. Chicks fed the low phosphorus negative control diet had lower (P<0.01) weight gain and feed intake compared with other dietary treatment groups and had lower (P<0.01) gain to feed ratio compared with chicks fed diet with supplementation of 600 g Allzyme SSF® / Ton in the entire experimental period. Dietary supplementation of Allzyme SSF® in the low phosphorus basal diet significantly increased (P<0.01) weight gain, feed intake and gain to feed ratio. Data from this trial indicate that supplementation of Allzyme SSF® in corn-soy based poultry diets can improve phosphorus utilization.

2008 POULTRY SCIENCE ASSOCIATION ANNUAL MEETING 

Effects of dietary supplementation of Allzyme SSF® on the performance of chicks fed wheat-based diets.
J.L. Pierce, T. Ao, A.J. Pescatore, A.H. Cantor, K.A. Dawson, and M.J. Ford.
Allzyme® SSF is a natural fermentation product that improves the utilization of fibrous feed by chicks. A 14-d trial using 160 1-day-old chicks was conducted to investigate the effects of Allzyme SSF® on the performance of chicks fed a soft red winter wheat based diet. Dietary treatments were: 1) wheat-soy basal diet containing 3,050 kcal ME / kg and 0.45% available phosphorus; 2) Diet 1 + 200 g Allzyme SSF® /Ton; 3) Low nutrient wheat-soy basal diet containing 2,975 kcal ME / kg and 0.35% available phosphorus; 4) Diet 3 + 200 g Allzyme SSF® /Ton. The wheat contained 11% crude protein. Eight replicate cages of 5 chicks were randomly assigned to each of 4 dietary treatments. Chicks were housed in starter cages in an environmentally controlled room with an ad libitum access to feed and water. Chicks fed the low nutrient wheat-soy basal diet had lower (P < 0.01) weight gain during both the 1–7 d and 1–14 d periods and lower gain to feed ratio in the 1–14 d period compared with other treatment groups. Dietary supplementation of Allzyme SSF® in the low nutrient wheat-soy basal diet significantly increased (P < 0.01) weight gain of chicks during both the 1–7 d and 1–14 d periods and tended to increase (by 8.7%) gain to feed ratio of chicks during the 1–14 d period. Data from this trial indicate that supplementation of Allzyme SSF® in wheat based diets for chicks can improve energy and phosphorus utilization.

Ammonia release and nutrient content of laying hen manure as affected by distillers dried grains with solubles and enzyme supplementation.
A.J. Pescatore, A. Singh, R.S. Gates, A. H. Cantor, J.L. Pierce, K.A. Dawson, T. Ao, and M.J. Ford.
The effects of using distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) with and without enzyme supplementation in laying hen diets on the nutrient content and ammonia release of manure was evaluated. Hens were fed one of five diets: 1) corn-soybean meal diet (16% CP, 2850 Kcal/kg ME); 2) corn-soybean meal diet with 25% DDGS (16% CP, 2850 Kcal/kg); 3) Diet 2 plus 0.1% enzyme preparation (Allzyme DDGS®, Alltech Inc.); 4) low energy corn-soybean mean diet with 25% DDGS (16% CP, 2550 Kcal/kg ME); and 5) Diet 4 plus 0.1% enzyme preparation. Manure samples were collected from eight groups of six hens for each of the dietary treatments. An equilibrium flux chamber technique was used to determine ammonia gas release from the manure. Manure samples were analyzed for pH, moisture content and percent N, P and K. There was no effect of treatments on moisture content or pH. Ammonia release was highest for hens fed the corn-soybean meal diet (Diet 1) and lowest for those fed the low energy DDGS diet (Diet 4). Total ammoniacal nitrogen content for all of the DDGS diets was higher than for the corn-soybean meal diet. Manure from hens fed the DDGS diets had lower P and K content than that from hens fed the corn-soybean diet. Total nitrogen content was lowest for manure from hens fed diets supplemented with the Allzyme DDGS® enzyme preparation (Diets 3 and 5). The results indicate that inclusion of DDGS and enzymes in laying hen diets can affect ammonia release and nutrient content of the manure.